Skip to content Skip to navigation

People

 

Thomas W. Gilligan

Photograph of Thomas W. Gilligan from Stanford News. Courtesy The University of Texas at Austin.

Thomas W. Gilligan assumed the role of the Tad and Dianne Taube Director of the Hoover Institution in September of 2015.  A scholar in economics and political science, Gilligan also serves as a senior fellow at Hoover.  Gilligan has had a long-standing relationship with the Hoover Institution and Stanford University serving as a Hoover national fellow in 1989-90 and a visiting faculty member at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business in 1989-90 and again in 1994.
 
Prior to joining the Hoover Institution, Gilligan was dean of the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin, one of the largest and most distinguished business schools in the United States. Before that, Gilligan held several key administrative roles at the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California. Most notable positions included interim Dean, Vice Dean of Undergraduate Education, director of the Ph.D. program, and Chair of the Finance and Business Economics Department. Gilligan holds the Centennial Chair in Business Education Leadership.
 
Gilligan received his B.A. in 1979 at the University of Oklahoma and his Ph.D. in Economics at Washington University in 1984. He taught Economics at the California Institute of Technology (1984-1987) and during his tenure at USC he held visiting appointments at Stanford University (1989-1990 and 1994) and Northwestern University (1995-1996). He was a staff economist at the Council of Economic Advisers in the White House. He also served in the United States Air Force from 1972-1976.

Deborah L. Rhode

Photograph of Deborah L. Rhode.

Deborah L. Rhode is the Ernest W. McFarland Professor of Law, the director of the Center on the Legal Profession, and the director of the Program in Law and Social Entrepreneurship at Stanford University. She is the most frequently cited scholar on legal ethics.  She has received the American Bar Association’s Michael Franck Award for contributions to the field of professional responsibility; the American Bar Foundation’s W. M. Keck Foundation Award for distinguished scholarship on legal ethics, the American Bar Foundation’s Outstanding Scholar Award, the American Bar Association’s Pro Bono Publico Award for her work on expanding public service opportunities in law schools, and the White House’s Champion of Change Award for a lifetime’s work in increasing access to justice.  She is the founding chair of the Association of American Law School’s section on leadership, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and vice chair of the board of Legal Momentum (formerly the NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund).  She is the former founding president of the International Association of Legal Ethics, the former president of the Association of American Law Schools, the former chair of the American Bar Association’s Commission on Women in the Profession, the former founding director of Stanford’s Center on Ethics, a former trustee of Yale University, and the former director of Stanford’s Institute for Research on Women and Gender.  She also served as senior counsel to the minority members of the Judiciary Committee, the United States House of Representatives, on presidential impeachment issues during the Clinton administration.

Professor Rhode graduated Phi Beta Kappa and summa cum laude from Yale College and received her legal training from Yale Law School.  After clerking for Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, she joined the Stanford faculty.  She is the author or coauthor of over thirty books in the area of professional responsibility, leadership, and gender.  She has served as a columnist for the National Law Journal and published editorials in the New York Times, Washington Post, Boston Globe, and Slate.  Recent publications include Women and Leadership, Adultery, The Trouble With Lawyers, What Women Want, Lawyers as Leaders, The Beauty Bias, Legal Ethics, Gender and Law, Moral Leadership, and Access to Justice.

Claude M. Steele

Photograph of Claude M. Steele.

Claude M. Steele is an American social psychologist and a Professor of Psychology at Stanford University.  He is best known for his work on stereotype threat and its application to minority student academic performance. His earlier work dealt with research on the self (e.g., self-image, self- affirmation) as well as the role of self-regulation in addictive behaviors. In 2010, he released his book, Whistling Vivaldi and Other Clues to How Stereotypes Affect Us, summarizing years of research on stereotype threat and the underperformance of minority students in higher education.

He is elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Science Board, the National Academy of Education, and the American Philosophical Society.  He currently serves as a trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and as a Fellow for both the American Institutes for Research and the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

He has served in several major academic leadership positions as the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost at UC Berkeley, the I. James Quillen Dean for the School of Education at Stanford University, and as the 21st Provost of Columbia University. Past roles also include serving as the President of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, as the President of the Western Psychological Association, and as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Psychological Society.

He holds B.A. in Psychology from Hiram College, an M.A. in Social Psychology from Ohio State University, and a Ph.D. in Social Psychology and Statistical Psychology from Ohio State University.  Professor Steele holds Honorary Doctorates from Yale University, Northwestern University, University of Chicago, University of Michigan, DePaul University andClaremont Graduate University.